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Article 6- The Role Of The Assistant Referee

Keith Hackett’s Article (6)

The Role Of The Assistant Referee

 

Can you Hackett? Questions are at the bottom of this article

Keith Hackett Sketch.jpg
 

THE ROLE OF THE ASSISTANT REFEREE

England have a great reputation for producing World Class assistant referees with the likes of Mark Warren, Philip Sharpe, Mike Mullarkey and Darren Cann running the line in the ultimate match the World Cup Final.

So, what is the role of the Assistant Referee coping with one of the most demanding roles in the modern game.

They have to be fit and possess an explosive sprint that ensures from a position in line with the second rearmost defender that they can make accurate judgements on offside.

It requires a great deal of concentration and to have a high level of awareness and alertness when they are called upon to make those big calls.

Remember a player in an offside position as not committed and offence unless he is active, interfering with an opponent or gaining an advantage.

Assistant referees away from the game have to practice and perfect their flagging technique at the same time adopt a wait, wait and see technique to ensure that accurate decisions are made. With the communication kits they are in constant contact with their colleagues often coming in first on those big calls.

Flagging techniques are important

Flagging techniques are important

Here is the offside law which I replicate to demonstrate that law knowledge is so important

A player in an offside position at the moment the ball is played or touched* by a team-mate is only penalised on becoming involved in active play by:

·        interfering with play by playing or touching a ball passed or touched by a team-mate or

·        interfering with an opponent by:

o   preventing an opponent from playing or being able to play the ball by clearly obstructing the opponent’s line of vision or

o   challenging an opponent for the ball or

·        *The first point of contact of the ‘play’ or ‘touch’ of the ball should be used

o   clearly attempting to play a ball which is close when this action impacts on an opponent or

o   making an obvious action which clearly impacts on the ability of an opponent to play the ball

or

·        gaining an advantage by playing the ball or interfering with an opponent when it has:

o   rebounded or been deflected off the goalpost, crossbar, match official or an opponent

o   been deliberately saved by any opponent

A player in an offside position receiving the ball from an opponent who deliberately plays the ball (except from a deliberate save by any opponent) is not considered to have gained an advantage.

A ‘save’ is when a player stops, or attempts to stop, a ball which is going into or very close to the goal with any part of the body except the hands/arms (unless the goalkeeper within the penalty area).

In situations where:

·        a player moving from, or standing in, an offside position is in the way of an opponent and interferes with the movement of the opponent towards the ball this is an offside offence if it impacts on the ability of the opponent to play or challenge for the ball; if the player moves into the way of an opponent and impedes the opponent’s progress (e.g. blocks the opponent) the offence should be penalised under Law 12.

·        a player in an offside position is moving towards the ball with the intention of playing the ball and is fouled before playing or attempting to play the ball, or challenging an opponent for the ball, the foul is penalised as it has occurred before the offside offence

·        an offence is committed against a player in an offside position who is already playing or attempting to play the ball, or challenging an opponent for the ball, the offside offence is penalised as it has occurred before the foul challenge

Judging offside is only one of their mosaic of roles.

Whole of the ball crossed the whole of the line?

Whole of the ball crossed the whole of the line?

 They indicate when:

·        the whole of the ball leaves the field of play and which team is entitled to a corner kick, goal kick or throw-in

·        a player in an offside position may be penalised

·        a substitution is requested

·        at penalty kicks, the goalkeeper moves off the goal line before the ball is kicked and if the ball crosses the line; if additional assistant referees have been appointed the assistant referee takes a position in line with the penalty mark

The assistant referee’s assistance also includes monitoring the substitution procedure.

substitution.jpeg

The assistant referee may enter the field of play to help control the 9.15m (10 yards) distance.

They are an important member of the officiating team and currently Darren Cann is the man who continues to be the best in the world when it comes to running the line. 

Keith Hackett


CAN YOU HACKETT?

QUESTION 10

A striker attempts an elaborate back heel but completely misses the ball and instead catches a defender who is caught out by surprise, in the knee cap.  The defender falls to the ground blood streaming from his knee.  You immediately blow up. The striker turns round and apologises claiming it was accidental.  The defender claims it was reckless as he waits to be carried off.  What action if any do you take.                                                  

QUESTION 11

A defender on the goal line instinctively catches the ball as it is about to go in.  The force of the shot forces the player’s hands back and the ball over the goal line.  The defender realising what he has done, instantly drops the ball into his own goal.  What action do you take? 

Check your answers here